St Andrews University students from Coldingham

An online database of St Andrews University students between 1747 and 1897 was recently launched. This provides a searchable biographical database of alumni between those years. The biographies were compiled by the former Keeper of the Muniments at St Andrews, Dr Robert Smart. For more descriptive details see the blog post here, and search the database here.

Seven students associated with Coldingham show up in the database:

  • Patrick Brydone (1736-1818) son of the Rev. Robert Brydone minister at Coldingham. Student 1750-1754.
  • William Paterson, b. 1810 son of Thomas Paterson, Coldingham, and Jane Young. Student 1829-1830. Later missionary and minister at various places, including Cockburnspath.
  • David Munro (1817-1902), son of Alexander Munro, merchant St Andrews, and Isabel Walker. Student 1831-1839. Later teacher at Ayr Academy and minister at Tweedmouth and Coldingham.
  • Andrew Henderson (1825-1904), born at Kirkwall, son of Andrew Henderson, custom house officer Dundee, and Margaret Loutit. Student 1839-1843. United Presbyterian minister at Coldingham and Paisley.
  • John Greenfield, from Coldingham. Student 1855-1856. Possibly my relative, son of John Greenfield and Janet McKay, later teacher at Hawick and Denholm, and died 1915 at Paisley aged 80.
  • Thomas Young, b. ca 1845/6 at Ayton/Galashiels, possibly son of William Young, Coldingham, and Ann Cockburn. Student 1866-1875.
  • John Ramsay (1871-ca1940), son of Alexander Ramsay, mason Cupar, and Jessie Miller. Student 1886-1890. Later teacher at Cupar, Castle Douglas, Culross and Coldingham.

Author: vivdunstan

Academic historian, genealogist, former computer scientist, and Doctor Who fan.

2 thoughts on “St Andrews University students from Coldingham”

  1. Hi Viv
    So glad you like the new database. Isn’t Bob’s work amazing? It has been a really interesting experiment to convert it to a database and see what this enables…
    Rachel

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    1. Yes it’s a fantastic resource. I’ve been telling fellow one-place studiers (researching different places) and one-name studiers (who study all refs to specific surnames) about it. It’s great to see it online like this. It also brings back happy memories for me of going in to see Bob often to ask about graduates, when I was meant to be a science undergraduate in the early 1990s, and kept getting sidetracked by historical research!

      Like

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